|Table of Contents|

Population, toxicity and pathogenicity of Fusarium oxysporum in continuously cropped soil of Artemisia selengens with or without Fusarium wilt(PDF)

Chinese Journal of Applied & Environmental Biology[ISSN:1006-687X/CN:51-1482/Q]

Issue:
2015 02
Page:
228-233
Research Field:
Articles
Publishing date:

Info

Title:
Population, toxicity and pathogenicity of Fusarium oxysporum in continuously cropped soil of Artemisia selengens with or without Fusarium wilt
Author(s):
CHEN Lihua CHANG Yijun WANG Changchun SHAO Xiaohou MA Chaoyue XU Mingxi WANG Dongsheng
1College of Water Conservancy and Hydropower Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098, China 2Nanjing Institute of Vegetable, Nanjing 210042, China 3Qixia Agricultural Technology Extension Center, Nanjing 210046, China
Keywords:
Artemisia selengens continuously cropped soil Fusarium wilt Fusarium oxysporum fusaric acid
CLC:
S154.3 : S432
PACS:
DOI:
10.3724/SP.J.1145.2014.08032
DocumentCode:

Abstract:
Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum (FO) is the major disease in continuously cropped Artemisia selengens. This research investigated the population, toxicity (production of fusaric acid) and pathogenicity of FO in the continuously cropped soil of Artemisia selengens with or without Fusarium wilt. The results showed that FO population in the soils with 40% or more disease incidence of Fusarium wilt was significantly higher than that in soil without disease (P < 0.05). FO population in the soils with 25% or lower disease incidence was not significantly different from the control (P > 0.05). Percentages of FO with high toxicity (yield of Fusarium acid > 500 μg L-1) were higher (P < 0.05) in soil with Fusarium wilt of 85% and 40% than in soil with Fusarium wilt of 11% or without disease. The same trend was found in the pathogenicity of FO. Populations of FO in the continuously cropped soil were not significantly correlated with the years of continuous cropping. Disease incidence, percentages of FO with high toxicity and high pathogenicity (disease index > 2) were significantly correlated with years of continuous cropping in the soil with high incidence of Fusarium wilt, but not in soil without disease. In the continuously cropped soils of higher disease incidence of Fusarium wilt, the population of FO, percentages of FO with high toxicity and high pathogenicity were also significantly higher (P < 0.05) compared to the continuously cropped soil without Fusarium wilt. In the soil without Fusarium wilt, no significant relationship was found between continuous cropping years and the population of FO, percentages of FO with high toxicity and high pathogenicity (P > 0.05). The results offer a basis for further study of the mechanism of Fusarium wilt in continuously cropped soil and the biocontrol of the disease. Keywords Artemisia selengens; continuously cropped soil; Fusarium wilt; Fusarium oxysporum; fusaric acid

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Last Update: 2015-04-27