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Study on Hg2+ adsorption kinetics of biosorbent made from marine alga Durvillaea potatorum(PDF)

Chinese Journal of Applied & Environmental Biology[ISSN:1006-687X/CN:51-1482/Q]

Issue:
Vol.07 No.4
Page:
344-347
Research Field:
Reviews
Publishing date:

Info

Title:
Study on Hg2+ adsorption kinetics of biosorbent made from marine alga Durvillaea potatorum
Author(s):
MA Weidonget al.
( State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai200092, China) (1 School of Environmental Engineering, Griffith University, Nathan Campus, BrisbaneQLD4111, Australia)
Keywords:
Keywords marine alga (Durvillaea potatorum) biosorption of heavy metals Hg2+ adsorption kinetics wastewater treatment
CLC:
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PACS:
DOI:
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DocumentCode:

Abstract:
Abstract The adsorption kinetics of Hg2+ by a low-cost biosorbent made from marine alga Durvillaea potatorum was studied in this paper. The biosorbent was a pretreated biomass of D. potatorum with a particular process. The kinetic profiles at various conditions including effects of temperatures, initial Hg2+ concentrations and particle sizes were obtained. The results showed that the kinetics of adsorption were relatively fast, with semi-saturation time tS≤60 min for an average particle sizes of 0.45 mm. All particle size and temperature tests showed that the same equilibrium point was reached and less time was required for smaller particle size and higher temperature to reach the equilibrium. The equilibrium uptake capacities were independent of particle size and temperature. The mass transfer effect was investigated and the mass transfer coefficients kL were obtained by regression in this paper. It was found that Hg2+ adsorption rate of the biosorbent was controlled dominantly by liquid-membrane mass transfer rate when adsorbing time t≤tS. The mass transfer coefficients kL ranged from 0.0407 cm/s to 0.112 cm/s within the scope of the measurement. This study implied the feasibility of large-scale application for the treatment of Hg2+ bearing industrial wastewater by the biosorbent from marine alga Durvillaea potatorum. Fig 5, Tab 2, Re11

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Last Update: 2002-10-31