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ZHAO Xingge1, ZHANG Shiting2 & NIU Kechang1(PDF)

Chinese Journal of Applied & Environmental Biology[ISSN:1006-687X/CN:51-1482/Q]

Issue:
2020 01
Page:
1-11
Research Field:
Articles
Publishing date:

Info

Title:
ZHAO Xingge1, ZHANG Shiting2 & NIU Kechang1
Author(s):
-
1 School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University , Nanjing 210023, China
2 School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University , Lanzhou 730000, China
Keywords:
alpine meadow soil fungi plant community functional traits soil attributes
CLC:
-
PACS:
DOI:
10.19675/j.cnki.1006-687x.2019.03047
DocumentCode:

Abstract:
We aim to study the relationships between soil fungal diversity and plant community functional traits (Community-weighted mean, CWM, and Functional diversity, FD) and soil attributes under various habitats (valley, north and south slopes and top hill ) at each of three test sites. High-throughput sequencing technology was applied to analyze soil fungal diversity. Five key functional traits were investigated for four typical habitats of three test sites to quantify CWM and FD. The generalized linear mixed model was performed to examine the relationship between soil fungi community and soil attributes, CWM and FD in four typical habitats of the three test sites Generalized canonical discriminant analysis and partial regression were conducted to analyze the correlation among soil fungal diversity and soil attributes, CWM and FD. ( 1) T he dominant fungal phyla of soil fungi community in alpine meadows were Zygomycota, Ascomyceta, Basidiomycota and Glomeromycota, and the dominant genera were Mortierella, Cryptococcus, Inocybe, Sebacina and Hygrocybe. There was significant difference in four habitats for Zygomycota, Glomeromycota and Mortierella. T he relative abundance of Zygomycota and Mortierella in top hill soil was significantly higher than that in other three habitats (valley, north and south slopes ). The relative abundance of Glomeromycota in valley was significantly higher than that in other three habitats (north and south slopes and top hill ). (2) Soil attributes took account for 21% of variation in soil fungal richness, with soil fungal richness associated positively with soil pH, total nitrogen and available nitrogen, but negatively with soil organic carbon, soil organic matter and C/N ratio. No significant correlation was found between soil fungal Shannon index and soil attributes. (3) CWM of five traits took account for 21% of variation in soil fungal richness, with soil fungal richness correlated negatively with CWM of plant height. (4) FD of five traits took account for 33% of variation in soil fungal richness, which increased with FD of leaf nitrogen and leaf phosphorus, but declined with FD of plant height and leaf dry matter content. Neither CWM nor FD significantly correlated with soil fungal Shannon index. The soil fungal richness , rather than Shannon index, not only associated with soil attributes but also with plant community functional traits. The interaction between soil fungal richness and FD plays an important role in promoting ecosystem stability in alpine meadows.

References

Relationships between soil fungal diversity and plant community functional traits and soil attributes in Tibetan alpine meadows *

Memo

Memo:
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Last Update: 2019-06-19